Contact Information
Address(Office)E12-3008 Hongjie Zhang
(Lab)N22-2031
Phone(Office)8822 4518
(Lab)8822 2732
Fax8822 2314
EmailHJZhang@um.edu.mo
Education
Ph.D.University of Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan
M.Sc.Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China
B.Sc.Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou, China
Positions
2015-presentAssistant Professor, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Macau
2011-2014Instructor, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
2006-2011Research fellow, Massachusetts General Hospital/Harvard Medical School, Boston, USA
2003-2006Postdoctoral fellow, Albert Einstein College of Medicine, New York, USA
2003Lecturer, University of Tokushima, Tokushima, Japan
Research Interests
The main research interest of our group is focused on the molecular mechanism of organ morphogenesis. Majority of human diseases are originated from internal organs. Understanding the molecular mechanism of organ formation and maintenance is fundamental to developmental biology and medicine. However, currently the process of organ morphogenesis is not possible to be examined in complex organisms in vivo. We use genetically tractable and structurally simple C. elegans as a model system, employing genetic, biochemical and functional genomics approaches to investigate how organs form and how the shape and size of organs are regulated and maintained.We are also interested in in vivo sphingolipid (SL) homeostatic network regulation. SLs are involved in a wide array of cellular processes and are affected in a variety of diseases ranging from diabetes to cancer, from neurodegenerative- to cardiovascular diseases. Yet, little is known about their roles in the development of these diseases and their potential to serve as drugs or treatment targets. We use the C. elegans model, with a simple set of conserved SLs, to delineate the SL homeostatic network and its regulation on the whole organism level and to explore the link between SL metabolites and the pathology of the diseases linked to defects in SL biosynthesis and metabolism.
Representative Publications
  • Wang C, Cheng X, Tan J, Ding Z, Wang W, Yuan D, Li G, Zhang H#, Zhang X#, 2018. “Reductive cleavage of C=C bond as a new strategy to turn on dual fluorescence for effective sensing H2S”, Chemical Science. DOI: 10.1039/C8SC03430C. (# co-corresponding author)
  • Zou J, Zhang W, Zhang H, Zhang XD, Peng B, & Zheng J, 2018. Studies on Aminoglycoside Susceptibility Identify a Novel Function of KsgA to Secure Protein Translational Fidelity during Antibiotic Stress. Antimicrob. Agents. Ch. 62: e00853-18.
  • Cheng X, Zheng J, Li G, Göbel V, Zhang H, 2018. Degradation for better survival? Role of ubiquitination in epithelial morphogenesis. Biol. Rev. Cam. Philos. Soc. 93: 1438-1460.
  • Deng H, Zeng J, Zhang T, Gong L, Zhang H, Cheung E, Jones C, Li G, 2018. Histone H3. 3K27M Mobilizes Multiple Cancer/Testis (CT) Antigens in Pediatric Glioma. Mol. Cancer Res. 16: 623-633.
  • Zhang N, Khan LA, Membreno E, Jafari G, Yan S, Zhang H# and Gobel V#, 2017. The C. elegans intestine as a model for intercellular lumen morphogenesis and in vivo polarized membrane biogenesis at the single-cell level: Labeling by Antibody Staining, RNAi Loss-of-function Analysis and Imaging. J. Vis. Exp. 128: e56100, doi:10.3791/56100. (# co-corresponding author)
  • Zhang N, Membreno E, Raj S, Zhang H, Khan LA and Gobel V, 2017. The C. elegans excretory canal as a model for intracellular lumen morphogenesis and in vivo polarized membrane biogenesis in a single cell: labeling by GFP-fusions, RNAi Interaction Screen and Imaging. J. Vis. Exp. 128: e56101, doi:10.3791/56101.
  • Zhang H, Abraham N, Khan LA and Gobel V, 2015. RNAi-based biosynthetic pathway screens to identify in vivo functions of non-nucleic-acid-based metabolites such as lipids. Nat. Protoc. 10: 681-700.
  • Zhang H, Kim A, Abraham N, Khan LA and Gobel V, 2013. Vesicular sorting controls the polarity of expanding membranes in the C. elegans intestine. Worm 2: 1-13.
  • Khan LA, Zhang H, Abraham N, Fleming JT, Hall DH, Buechner M and Gobel V, 2013. Intracellular lumen extension requires ERM-1-dependent apical membrane expansion and AQP-8-mediated flux. Nat. Cell Biol. 15: 143-156. (Featured as News & Views Article in the same journal.)
  • Zhang H, Kim A, Abraham N, Khan LA, Fleming JT, and Gobel V, 2012. Clathrin and AP-1 mediate apical polarity and lumen formation in C. elegans tubulogenesis. Development 139: 2071-2083.
  • Zhang H, Abraham N, Khan LA, Hall DH, Fleming JT, and Gobel V, 2011. Apicobasal domain identities of expanding tubular membranes depend on glycosphingolipid biosynthesis. Nat. Cell Biol. 13: 1189-1201. (Featured as News & Views Article in the same journal, cited by Faculty of 1000 and highlighted as Editor’s Choice in Science.)
  • Zhang H and Emmons S, 2009. Regulation of the Caenorhabditis elegans posterior Hox gene egl-5 by microRNA and the polycomb-like gene sop-2. Dev. Dyn. 238: 595-603.
  • Mito T, Kobayashi C, Sarashina I, Zhang H, Shinahara W, Miyawaki K, Shinmyo Y, Ohuchi H and Noji S, 2007. even-skipped has gap-like, pair-rule-like, and segmental functions in the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, a basal, intermediate germ insect (Orthoptera). Dev. Biol. 303: 202-213.
  • Mito T, Sarashina I, Zhang H, Iwahashi A, Okamoto H, Miyawaki K, Shinmyo Y, Ohuchi H and Noji S, 2005. Non-canonical functions of hunchback in segment patterning of the intermediate germ cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Development 132: 2069-2079.
  • Zhang H, Shinmyo Y, Mito T, Miyawaki K, Ohuchi H and Noji S, 2005. Expression pattern of homeotic genes Scr, Antp, Ubx and abd-A during embryogenesis of the cricket Gryllus bimaculatus. Gene Expr. Patterns. 5: 491-502.
  • Zhang H, Shinmyo Y, Hirose A, Mito T, Inoue Y, Ohuchi H, Loukeris TG, Eggleston P and Noji S, 2002. Extrachromosomal Transposition of the Transposable Element Minos Occurs in Embryos of the Cricket Gryllus bimaculatus, Dev. Growth Differ. 44: 409-417.
  • Miyawaki K, Mito T, Srashina I, Zhang H, Shinmyo Y, Ohuchi H and Noji S, 2004. Involvement of Wingless/Armadillo signaling in the posterior sequential segmentation in the cricket, Gryllus bimaculatus (Orthoptera), as revealed by RNAi analysis. Mech Dev. 121: 119-30.
  • Zhang H and Ito Y, 2001. pH Control of Substances Permeation through a Porous Membrane Self-Assembled with Poly(Acrylic Acid) Loop Brush, Langmuir, 17: 8336-8340.
  • Wang J, Zhang H, Cao S, Liu J and Liu S, 2001. Toughened Polypropylene with Balanced Rigidity V. Melt Rheological Properties, Polym. Adv. Technol. 12: 734-9.
  • Zhang H, Wang J, Cao S and Wang Y, 2001. Toughened Polypropylene with Balanced Rigidity IV. Morphology, Crystallization Behavior and Thermal Properties, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 79: 1351-1358.
  • Zhang H, Wang J, Li J, Cao S and Shan A, 2001. Toughened Polypropylene with Balanced Rigidity III. Compositions and Mechanical Properties, J. Appl. Polym. Sci. 79: 1345-1350.
  • Zhang H, Wang J, Chen M, Cao S and Wang X, 2000. Toughened Polypropylene with Balanced Rigidity II. Morphology, Melt Flow Rate and Melting Point of Toughening Master Batch, Polym. Adv. Technol. 11: 342-8.
  • Zhang H, Wang J, Cao S and Shan A, 2000. Toughened Polypropylene with Balanced Rigidity I. Preparation and Chemical Structure of Toughening Master Batch, Polym. Adv. Technol. 11: 334-41

Book Chapter

  • Zhang H and Ito Y, 2002. Smart Material Systems Using Signal-Responsive Polyelectrolytes, in “Handbook of Polyelectrolytes and Their Applications” edited by S. K. Tripathy, J. Kumar and H. S. Nalwa, American Scientific Publishers, 183-206.
Research Grants
The Science and Technology Development Fund of Macao SAR, FDCT 050/2018/A2
The Science and Technology Development Fund of Macao SAR, FDCT 060/2015/A2
FDCT-MOST joint grant, FDCT 018/2017/AMJ
Multi-Year Research Grant of UM, MYRG 2017-00082-FHS
Multi-Year Research Grant of UM, MYRG 2016-00066-FHS
Start-up Research Grant of UM, SRG 2015-00005-FHS